Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Dr. Crouch receives prestigious award. The Pet Philanthropy Circle has named Dr. Crouch Outstanding Veterinarian for 2014:

2014 Pet Hero Award Winner - Dr. David T. Crouch, DVM Outstanding Veterinarian

The Pet Philanthropy Circle’s mission is to save and enhance the quality of animal lives by promoting greater public awareness of their welfare and the causes that protect them.  We accomplish this through educational programs,  raising funds for qualified animal rescue organizations and the Pet Hero Awards.

Monday, September 9, 2013

Dr. David Crouch attends prestigious orthopaedic surgery conference

Dr. David T. Crouch recently attended the Veterinary Arthrology Advancement Association (VA3) meeting in Naples, FL. The meeting is hosted annually by Arthrex, Inc. This elite group of 45 orthopedic veterinary surgeons from around the world come together to discuss and refine the latest surgical techniques.
This conference focused on state-of-the art advances in ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) reconstruction.  All who attended had to be skilled at the advanced level in arthroscopic surgery.
Continuing education is always important no matter what profession you are in. At Western Carolina Veterinary Surgery, we take this seriously. It is very important to us that we are up-to-date with the latest and greatest breakthroughs. Dr. Crouch is one of the leading experts in veterinary orthopedics. Please contact us if you have a question regarding your pet.

Monday, August 22, 2011

Dr. David Crouch attends prestigious orthopaedic surgery conference

Dr. David T. Crouch recently attended the Veterinary Arthrology Advancement Association (VA3) meeting in Naples, FL. The meeting is hosted annually by Arthrex, Inc. This elite group of 45 orthopedic veterinary surgeons from around the world come together to discuss and refine the latest surgical techniques

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More specifically, the course featured advance arthrosopic approaches to many orthopaedic problems affecting small animals. They also discussed and gave examples of new implants and data sharing in order to improve outcomes in veterinary orthopaedics. All who attended had to be at the advance level in arthroscopy.

Continuing education is always important no matter what profession you are in. At Western Carolina Veterinary Surgery, we take this seriously. It is very important to us that we are up-to-date with the latest and greatest breakthroughs. The more we can fine tune our skills, the better service we will be able to provide you and your pet.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Dr. Crouch pilots sick Boxer dog to safety.

Lilly is a white boxer mix from Rome, GA, who had a litter of puppies, but they all died. She was quite sick and heartworm positive. She successfully recovered from the heartworm treatment, and is now a 50-lb healthy, sweet adult who has found her "furever" home thanks to Dorothy Peters of Carolina Boxer Rescue (Graham, NC).

With the help of another pilot, Mr. Bob Hite, Lilly arrived at the Asheville airport on the morning of June 16, 2011. Dr. David Crouch and his son Mark flew Lilly to Burlington, NC. They were greeted by Dorothy Peters and Doug Allison who will be her foster parents.

Dr. Crouch and Western Carolina Veterinary Surgery are proud supporters of Pilot N Paws.

www.pilotsnpaws.org
video

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Dr. Crouch Attends Conference In Aspen, Colorado

Dr. Crouch recently attended the Veterinary Orthopedic Society Conference in Aspen, Colorado. The purpose of the Veterinary Orthopedic Society's annual conference is to present a forum where individuals involved in the area of orthopedics can meet to discuss or exchange ideas pertaining to the advancement of the field and improvement of patient care. Veterinarians from over 30 countries worldwide were in attendance. Dr. Crouch is thrilled to have had the opportunity to attend this prestigious conference. Staying on the forefront of 21st century science helps to provide the very best care for our beloved veterinary patients.

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Causes and Signs of Osteochondrosis

Osteochondrosis (OCD) occurs commonly in the shoulders of immature, large and giant-breed dogs. The lesion appears on the caudal surface of the humeral head (Figure 1). Although your dog may be lame in only one leg, this condition is often present in the opposite leg. This condition results in a cartilage flap found on the humeral head. In some cases, the resulting defect occupies half of the area of the humeral head. The cartilage flap may completely detach from the underlying bone and become lodged in the back of the joint pouch.

Causes
The causes of OCD considered to be multifactorial with input from management, genetic and nutritional interactions in young growing dogs.

Incidence and Prevalence
Large and giant-breed dogs are commonly affected. Males are more commonly affected than females.

Signs and Symptoms
Clinical signs often develop when the dog is between 4 and 8 months of age. Dogs usually show a lameness of one forelimb. In many cases, there is a gradual onset of lameness that improves after rest and worsens after exercise.

Risk Factors
Risk factors for OCD include age, gender, breed (genetic), rapid growth, and nutrient excesses, primarily calcium excesses. The hereditary nature is suggested because of high frequency of occurrence within certain breeds of dogs and within certain bloodlines. Males are more commonly affected than females.

When to Seek Veterinary Advice
If your young large breed dog is persistently lame in a forelimb, especially after exercise, you should have a physical exam performed. If the dog is painful on palpation of the shoulder, usually during shoulder extension and flexion, then radiographs of the shoulder should be made to evaluate for OCD.


Please contact Western Carolina Veterinary Surgery for further information.
828.684.0019


- Information provided by American College of Veterinary Surgery.

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Pain Behaviors - What To Look Out For

As time goes by our pets settle into a routine of their own. New and somewhat odd behaviors need to be not only noticed, but for the benefit of your pet, addressed in a timely manner. Some new behaviors are harmless and developed out of preference while others are developed from pain. Take a look below at the examples the American College of Veterinary Surgery gives for possible causes of pain and signals of distress

Causes for pain may be:

  • Physical trauma, such as falling down or being hit by something.
  • Internal organ problems, such as intestinal upset or kidney blockage.
  • Surgical procedures, such as abdominal surgery or bone surgery.
  • Brain or spine problems, such as a slipped disc, pinched nerve or headache.
  • Degenerative changes, such as arthritis and cartilage damage.

Our reaction to pain is seen as “pain behavior”. A child cries when he breaks his arm. A woman holds her head and squints her eyes when having a migraine headache. A man winces when he stands up on his bad knee. To an observer, these behaviors display pain in action. In the veterinary medical setting, we use these pain behaviors, common to each different species but unique in each different patient, to grade the pain experience.

Many owners are surprised to learn that their pet may be experiencing pain, since some pain behaviors are not seen in people. Common pain behaviors are:

  • Crying and/or whining (dogs)
  • Growling and/or purring (cats)
  • Hiding (cats and dogs)
  • Not grooming (cats)
  • Squinting (cats)
  • Glassy-eyed, vacant look (dogs)
  • Hunched up body (cats and dogs)
  • Restlessness and changing positions a lot (dogs)
  • Not moving from one spot (cats)
  • Irritable or aggressive (cats and dogs)
  • No appetite (cats and dogs)
  • Shaking and trembling (dogs)
  • Protecting the hurting body part (cats and dogs)
For more information on pain and the management of pain, visit the American College of Veterinary Surgery. This excellent resource will lend you great information on many pet owner concerns.

www.WCVS.org
www.ACVS.org